Tag Archives: leader

Teachers are Leaders

If you take the time to think about the impact that teachers have had in your life, you may be surprised.  But one thing that you can conclude in such an exercise is that you are the person you are, by and large, because of the influence of teachers throughout your life.

For me, I can point to eight different teachers throughout my life that had an impact on my educational experience.

Mrs. Jozsa was my seventh grade English teacher at St. Henry Junior High School in Cleveland.  She was an interesting person with a lot of character, and she was a character, too.  What I learned from her was that I didn’t know as much English as I thought I did.  After what I thought was a successful stint in Major Work courses in the third through sixth grade, I promptly earned a C+ in English for my first grading period under Mrs. Jozsa.  I learned from that experience that what I thought I knew was hardly enough to move to the next level. My parents were flabbergasted, and I was surprised, too, but it caused me to dig a little deeper in my studies at a very important time in my life.  She took her job very seriously, and was always encouraging.  By the time I finished her class, I received an “A” in English. (If you want some perspective as to how long ago this was for me, the brand new hit song during that year was Let’s Stay Together by Al Green).

My first English teacher in the ninth grade at Chanel High School was Fr. James. He was a pleasant, older gentleman with white hair, and his classes were legendary because he would crack open the windows of his classroom during the winter months, which according to his theory, would keep all of his students awake and keep their blood pumping.  My theory was that I was freezing to death and that I would need someone to pump my chest to revive me.  Anyway, you wouldn’t dare fall asleep in his class, or you might have been carried out on a stretcher due to hypothermia.  My class motto for Fr. James was “stay awake…stay alive.”

It got better from there.  I enjoyed my class experiences in 11th and 12th grade with Mr. Edward Gotch (Algebra and Calculus) and in 12th grade with Mr. Bruce Domski, who taught A.P. English.  Our big book for the year was to read and review The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.  My senior year of high school was my breakout year as I had my best GPA and my best overall experience as a student.

I will never forget Dr. Vincent McHale, who was my Political Science teacher at Case Western Reserve University.  He was so engaging that his classes really challenged my approach to national and international affairs, and I will never forget his comment that there were so many lawyers in the field at that time that some of them will be marching off of cliffs for a lack of work.  I made up my mind, at that moment, that I was NOT going to law school.

Even in my adulthood, my encounters during my Master’s program at Crown College with Dr. James Cowman and Dr. Gary Keisling were very special and formative as I grew in my studies.  Finally, my most recent Clinical Pastoral Education class with Fred Madren in Indianapolis made me helped me to reflect more about who I was as an individual in learning more about becoming a chaplain.  In any vocational environment, it is important for you to know who you are as a person before you can reach out and effectively help someone else.

What I hope you can see from my experience is that teachers do a lot more than just teach subjects.  They provide all sorts of wisdom and knowledge—from their own education and from personal experiences—that shape the lives of everyone that they come into contact with.  Many teachers, whether they know it or not, are always providing this wisdom and knowledge—both inside and outside of the classroom.

Teaching is a God-given talent and ability.  It is referenced in Scripture as one of the gifts referenced within the body of Christ:

Romans 12:6-8 NIV

We have different gifts, according to the grace given to each of us. If your gift is prophesying, then prophesy in accordance with your faith; if it is serving, then serve; if it is teaching, then teach; if it is to encourage, then give encouragement; if it is giving, then give generously; if it is to lead, do it diligently; if it is to show mercy, do it cheerfully. 

Interestingly, teachers use all of these attributes in carrying out their responsibilities:  service, encouragement, giving, leadership and mercy.  We will look at one of these attributes—leadership.  Leaders perform their duties with care and concern for those who they are responsible for.

Teachers are leaders.

The Bible stresses the importance of gaining wisdom and knowledge, and in listening to others who have their own experiences to share with you.  Jesus Christ spent the better part of two years giving instruction to His disciples.  He was a patient teacher in the same way as Scripture is defined:

2 Timothy 3:16-17 ESV

All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be competent, equipped for every good work.

The disciples were being trained by Jesus Christ for a very good reason—they were to be the ones who would carry forth the Good News after Christ would leave them.  He was the ultimate Teacher (he was called “Rabbi” in Scripture, which means “Teacher.”)  Jesus provided the instruction and later “opened their minds to understand the Scriptures” (Luke 24:45).  Their ministry, as well as anyone’s ministry, has to begin and continue with teaching, and not only teaching, but being open to be taught, as well.

Teachers share this information freely and openly, and it is good and beneficial to be a teacher of not only God’s Word, but in all areas of life.

Teachers are leaders.

Teaching carries with it a tremendous responsibility.  Teaching is not for everyone.

James 3:1

Not many of you should become teachers, my brothers, for you know that we who teach will be judged with greater strictness.

Judged by who? Well, by God Himself.  Whether you are teaching the Bible from Sunday school or from the pulpit, or a college professor or high school instructor, you are charged with making sure that whoever you are teaching is guided in the right direction.  Though this verse to follow is intended for those who mislead young people causing them to move away from Jesus Christ, you get the idea of its overall message:

Luke 17:1-2 HCSB

He said to His disciples, “Offenses will certainly come, but woe to the one they come through! It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck and he were thrown into the sea than for him to cause one of these little ones to stumble.

Now you get the grasp of how this God-given attribute has a great responsibility.  It is not to be taken lightly.

Teachers are leaders.  They are meant to be leaders.  They are an important part of God’s creation.  They teach because they are born to teach others, and they do it for the love of it.

Teachers lead because they possess these six attributes, of which each begin with the letters from the word LEADER.

First, for the L in leader, teachers are “learners.”

A good teacher is willing to learn from others.  It’s logical, of course, but not all teachers, when they think they know it all, remain teachable.

A good teacher knows that he or she does not know it all.  A good bible teacher is always reading and studying.  It’s important to stay humble in order to be open to learning more, and as a result, doing more for your students.

Titus 2:7-8 ESV

Show yourself in all respects to be a model of good works, and in your teaching show integrity, dignity, and sound speech that cannot be condemned, so that an opponent may be put to shame, having nothing evil to say about us.

Next, the E in leader refers to being “energetic.”

An effective teacher is one who consistently approaches their job with energy.  A teacher with energy is infectious, in a positive way, to his or her students.  It has an amazing effect as it indicates to the student that learning is fun and exciting, and that the subject is very interesting.  There is nothing wrong with making the learning experience a happy and memorable one!

The A in leader refers to “application,” as in applying knowledge in your instruction.  Your knowledge may indeed be from your own training, but effective teaching and communication also involves sharing your own personal experiences or providing examples to round out the instruction process.  A great lesson in Scripture is a demonstration of love is the parable of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37.  It was the perfect way to describe how a person loves God and also a neighbor.

The D in leader refers to “devotion.”  Devotion is loving your work as a teacher, and having a devotion for your students.  There is something to be said about having an emotional connection with the work you do.  If it is used properly, it can have a dynamic effect within the classroom!  Teachers love what they do, and do what they love!

The second E in leader is for “expecting greatness.”

Teachers are to strive for the best.  As Jesus wants each of us to be our best in Christ, teachers must also want their students to pursue excellence.  Excellence is the realization of one’s pursuit of greatness.  Teachers must have high expectations for themselves as well as their students.  Success breeds success, and teachers are the ultimate catalysts for a student’s drive to be as good as one can be.

1 Timothy 4:11

Teach these things and insist that everyone learn them.

Finally, the R in leader stands for “results-oriented.”  A teacher wants to see students progress over time and, at the same time, gain more confidence in their own abilities.  Their students reflect a love for learning that will become more and more evident as they show their progress.

Luke 6:40 HCSB

The student is not above the teacher, but everyone who is fully trained will be like their teacher.

A teacher would like nothing better than to see his or her students become dynamic leaders and professionals.  They want the best for them, and that is why teachers set the bar very high in pushing their students to reach for success.

Teachers lead by example.

They are learners.

They are energetic.

They apply their knowledge as they teach.

They are devoted to their jobs.

They expect greatness from their students.

They are results-oriented.

Teachers make sacrifices for the sake of their students.  They do what they love and they love what they do.

Teachers build today’s leaders because teachers are leaders.

 

Copyright © Melvin Gaines

Advertisements

Discovering Your Gifts

A message summary of March 20, 2016 from Assistant Pastor Travis Jackson:

Ephesians 4:8, 11-12

For it says: When He ascended on high, He took prisoners to captivity; He gave gifts to people.

And he personally gave some to be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, for the training of the saints in the work of ministry, to build up the body of Christ.

We, as a church, based upon the command of Jesus Christ (Matthew 28:19-20), need to advance the gospel. If we fail to do so, we will decline in the body of Christ. We are called to advance the gospel. It is our main focus…to reach lost people, locally and globally.

In Ephesians 4:8, 10-11, we see what amounts to be the five pillars of the gospel.

Christ needed to ascend in order for His people to receive gifts. Without His ascension, the church’s call to advance the gospel would have been incomplete. Jesus told Mary Magdalene not to cling to Him was because He had not ascended yet. His work was not totally complete. While His work on the cross was finished through His crucifixion, His ascension gave the church the tools that it needed to be effective in proclaiming the gospel.

When Christ defeated all of the enemies of God, He received the rewards that were passed on to the church. He conquered those who conquered us, including Satan, sin and death. He had all authority to defeat His enemies and dispense His gifts to the people.

These five pillars of the gospels (apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers) are the highest gifts to be desired because these are the people that keep the gospel message going forward. All five of these gifts are distinct in their functionality, and they are synonymous with each other in that they are present to achieve the same goal.

Apostle: One who is sent for.

Jesus chose these individuals to be messengers of the gospel. Paul was later chosen as an apostle (Acts 2 and Acts 13). These individuals were chosen by Jesus to spread the gospel. Their primary responsibilities involved being an ambassador for Jesus Christ. Each of these apostles experienced the presence of Jesus Christ.

We know that the apostle Paul went on at least three missionary journeys (Rome, Corinth and Philippi) and started churches. He spread the good news. He was a church planter. He also allowed other leaders to take hold as pastors of these churches (Timothy at Ephesus, Titus at Corinth, etc.). If we are ambassadors here at our church, we are to continue this same process of planting churches and leaders.

By the way, there are no apostles today. You must have been trained by Jesus and even witnessed His resurrection. Even though there are no apostles, the work of these ambassadors for Christ is still present in today’s church. What we have today was built on the foundation of what the apostles accomplished.

Prophets are different from apostles. They are gifted to tell people what is to come. John the Baptist was the last prophet that emerged from the Old Testament, but the emergence of the church brought forth many more of them.

While you may not be a prophet, there is wisdom in looking to God’s Word for guidance as to what is coming in the future.

The church sends evangelists. It is totally different from that of the pastor and teachers. An evangelist does not necessarily have to tend to the flock of the church. Evangelists today are missionaries. As you contribute to the Great Commission Fund, you are contributing to the church evangelistic process.

It is our hope that we can, one day at our church, have a full-time evangelist on our staff. Are we evangelizing in the same way that Paul speaks of here?

If you did not have a pastor or a teacher here in the church, who would perform the duty?

A pastor needs to know how to teach. He is also the shepherd of the flock. He is to care for the members of the congregation.

Being a pastor can be rather frustrating, and heavy, at times.

Numbers 11:12-14

Did I conceive all these people? Did I give them birth so You should tell me, ‘Carry them at your breast, as a nursing woman carries a baby,’ to the land that You swore to give their fathers? Where can I get meat to give all these people? For they are crying to me: ‘Give us meat to eat!’ I can’t carry all these people by myself. They are too much for me.

While the burden may be heavy at times, it is still what God calls them to do; furthermore, it is not the pastor’s burden alone.

Hebrews 13:20

Now may the God of peace, who brought up from the dead our Lord Jesus–the great Shepherd of the sheep–with the blood of the everlasting covenant.

1 Peter 2:25

For you were like sheep going astray, but you have now returned to the Shepherd and Guardian of your souls.

Pastors should always make the effort to live more like Christ and less like themselves.

The teacher gives sound doctrine to the flock. They present sound wisdom that declares what is right or wrong according to God’s Word.

Ephesians 4:13-14

until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of Gods Son, growing into a mature man with a stature measured by Christs fullness. Then we will no longer be little children, tossed by the waves and blown around by every wind of teaching, by human cunning with cleverness in the techniques of deceit.

Do you know what your gifts are?

1 Corinthians 12:4-11

Now there are different gifts, but the same Spirit. There are different ministries, but the same Lord. And there are different activities, but the same God activates each gift in each person. A demonstration of the Spirit is given to each person to produce what is beneficial:

to one is given a message of wisdom

through the Spirit,

to another, a message of knowledge

by the same Spirit,

to another, faith by the same Spirit,

to another, gifts of healing by the one Spirit,

to another, the performing of miracles,

to another, prophecy,

to another, distinguishing between spirits,

to another, different kinds of languages,

to another, interpretation of languages.

But one and the same Spirit is active in all these, distributing to each person as He wills.

The Holy Spirit gives these gifts to people for the purpose of the members of the body to be empowered to proclaim the gospel. While we are not all teachers, pastors or prophets, each one of us has a gift to proclaim the gospel message and build up the body of Christ.

1 Corinthians 12:27-31

Now you are the body of Christ, and individual members of it. And God has placed these in the church:

first apostles, second prophets,

third teachers, next miracles,

then gifts of healing, helping,

managing, various kinds of languages.

Are all apostles? Are all prophets?

Are all teachers? Do all do miracles?

Do all have gifts of healing?

Do all speak in other languages?

Do all interpret?

But desire the greater gifts. And I will show you an even better way.

The purpose of knowing your gift is to fulfill your purpose in proclaiming the gospel of Jesus Christ. If we apply what Paul said about people being ambassadors for Christ, can we say that we are prepared to do these things?

We are looking forward to the future to build up the church to the place where we will bring forth ambassadors, evangelists and those who are compelled by God to move in the power of the Holy Spirit to proclaim the name of Jesus Christ.


The Fruits of The Spirit – Self-Control

Today’s message summary from Pastor Gus Brown:

Galatians 5:22-23

22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faith, 23 gentleness, self-control. Against such things there is no law.

 

Self-control is the measure of keeping one to remain focused on following Jesus Christ. It is an area that is controlled by the Holy Spirit. A lack of self control comes from being controlled by the flesh. Fleshly control is an opening to demonic influence. The Holy Spirit is present to allow for self control but a person must yield to the Spirit in order to maintain self control.

In Galatians 5, it is noted that the law is present because of sin, but it is the fruits of The Spirit that are beyond the law because you are acting in self control under God’s presence.

Self-control helps to capture all of our emotions. It is the virtue of one who masters his desires and passions, especially his sensual appetites.

Paul witnesses to Felix:

Acts 24:24-25

24 After some days, when Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish, he sent for Paul and listened to him on the subject of faith in Christ Jesus. 25 Now as he spoke about righteousness, self-control, and the judgment to come, Felix became afraid and replied, “Leave for now, but when I find time I’ll call for you.”

 

Felix is being addressed because he is in desperate need of exhibiting self-control. He has been through three marriages. He needed to hear from Paul about:

1. Faith in Christ

2. Righteousness

3. Self-control

4. Judgment to come

 

Paul is in control.

Matthew 10:19-20

19 But when they hand you over, don’t worry about how or what you should speak. For you will be given what to say at that hour, 20 because you are not speaking, but the Spirit of your Father is speaking through you.

 

You may feel you have a right to take action against a person for their mistreatment of you.

1 Samuel 24:4-6

4 so they said to him, “Look, this is the day the Lord told you about: ‘I will hand your enemy over to you so you can do to him whatever you desire.’” Then David got up and secretly cut off the corner of Saul’s robe.

5 Afterward, David’s conscience bothered him because he had cut off the corner of Saul’s robe. 6 He said to his men, “I swear before the Lord: I would never do such a thing to my lord, the Lord’s anointed. I will never lift my hand against him, since he is the Lord’s anointed.”

 

1 Samuel 26:7-10

7 That night, David and Abishai came to the troops, and Saul was lying there asleep in the inner circle of the camp with his spear stuck in the ground by his head. Abner and the troops were lying around him. 8 Then Abishai said to David, “Today God has handed your enemy over to you. Let me thrust the spear through him into the ground just once. I won’t have to strike him twice!” 

9 But David said to Abishai, “Don’t destroy him, for who can lift a hand against the Lord’s anointed and be blameless?” 10 David added, “As the Lord lives, the Lord will certainly strike him down: either his day will come and he will die, or he will go into battle and perish.

 

Self-control is a quality for anyone in leadership.

Titus 1:8

…but hospitable, loving what is good, sensible, righteous, holy, self-controlled.

 

Titus 2:2

Older men are to be level headed, worthy of respect, sensible, and sound in faith, love, and endurance.

 

1 Timothy 3:2

An overseer, therefore, must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, self-controlled, sensible, respectable, hospitable, an able teacher.

 

1 Corinthians 9:25

Now everyone who competes exercises self-control in everything. However, they do it to receive a crown that will fade away, but we a crown that will never fade away.

 

Having knowledge of God’s Word helps to build us up in self-control. Training under God’s Word requires it, and it will teach you how to rely more and more on the presence of God in your life to rely upon Him in maintaining self-control.

The value of self-control is perseverance (patience).

 

2 Peter 1:6

…knowledge with self-control, self-control with endurance, endurance with godliness.

 

Self-control can bring you respect (honor). It teaches how to avoid strife.

Proverbs 20:3

It is honorable for a man to resolve a dispute,

but any fool can get himself into a quarrel.

 

Self-control (calmness) brings rest. It provides the ability to work things out.

Ecclesiastes 10:4

If the ruler’s anger rises against you, don’t leave your place,

for calmness puts great offenses to rest.

 

Without self-control, you can only display the flesh at its worst and all of its foolishness.

Proverbs 14:29

A patient person shows great understanding,

but a quick-tempered one promotes foolishness.

 

2 Timothy 3:3

…unloving, irreconcilable, slanderers, without self-control, brutal, without love for what is good.

 

You are being evaluated by others in your words, actions and behaviors to see if you really are who you claim to be–a Christian. The Christian is expected to have self-control. Living a life of carnality will show only a lack of control.

God wants you to be able to have the joy of the presence of the Holy Spirit by operating in self-control. When the characteristics of the fruits of The Spirit are manifested before others, the very presence of God and His power can be experienced by others as you remain faithful to Him.